Why I Do Discovery Calls

If you look at the definition of a “discovery call” online, you’ll see words like: prospect, objectives, strategy, sales process, pain points, and leverage.

Um…yuck. A discovery call is a conversation with actual human beings, not data points. This kind of discovery call feels awful and kind of scary, both for me as the person who holds discovery calls and for the person I’m asking to set up a call. I do not want an initial call with me to feel scary or annoying, but this is what often runs through my own head when faced with scheduling a discovery call: “Why can’t I just hire them? Why do we have to have a call?”

And if those thoughts run through my head and I host discovery calls, I’m guessing they run through your head, too.

I don’t want to be sold on something and neither do you. Unfortunately, that’s what these calls can often feel like. And if you’re an introvert, the whole process can feel especially scary.

Though these calls might feel intimidating, they are super important in making sure clients have a positive and successful experience in our work together which is why I insist on them for extended 1:1 work together.

Why I do Discovery Calls

Meeting potential clients, talking about their project, and getting to know them helps me evaluate if I can, in fact, help them. It also allows them to evaluate and get to know me!

We discover if we like one another – yes, this is important! As your book coach, we will work very closely on a project that is near and dear to your heart. It’s imperative that we can connect and establish a relationship that allows for honest dialogue and feedback.

This work also requires a significant financial investment. I want to make sure you have an opportunity to ask questions before you make this investment.

What is the discovery call process in my business?

Before you can hire me for a book coaching package, you’ll schedule a call using my online scheduler. Once you pick your time, you’ll fill out a form with a bunch of questions about your project and about you as a writer. I also ask you to submit some sample pages of your writing.

When we get on the call, we chat about your project and how you’re moving forward with it. I can give you some guidance. If I feel like your project is something that I can help you with, I’ll offer you a package, all of which you can see on my website prior to the call, prices included (though payment plans are not on the site, they are available).

I absolutely believe in sharing prices. You’re a grown adult, and you know what your budget is. If you can’t afford me, don’t set up a call.

I will not spend time trying to convince you to work with me. If you need time to think about it, that’s fine. If you decide to pay and set up your first appointment on our discovery call, that’s perfect, too.

A discovery call is in no way an obligation to purchase a package or work together. It as much for you as it is for me to get to know one another and talk about your project.

What do I want to discover?

When I review the answers on the client intake form, I’m looking for both green lights – YES, this is a great project and potential client, and red lights – Woah, not so sure if this idea is ready to become a book or if I’m the right person to support the project or this writer. I can also get a sense of how I can help you move forward, whether we work together or not.

Your answers let me know a bit about your book project, where you are in the writing process, how you feel about yourself as a writer and your ability to craft a book, your writing and publishing goals. I want to know what kind of help and support you need and if I can provide that support.

For example, perhaps you think you’re ready to dive into your proposal but from what I see, you need more work on your idea development which means we’d start with a Book Foundations Package before the proposal or even an idea session to get clarity on what you’re writing.

The pages you submit give me some insight into where you are with the craft of writing. Book coaching can (and often does) involve work on some craft skills and editing, but that is not the focus, nor should it be. I’m not an editor. The pages also let me know how drilled down you are with your idea and your focus for your book.

All of this ultimately is for you, the potential client, so I can give you the best guidance and support as you move forward with your project.

What you can do prior to scheduling a call

If you’d like to get to know me (or anyone who does calls) before you schedule, I recommend following them on social media. Watch some of their videos and get a sense of what they’re like. Read some of their social media posts.

You should also explore their website and blog posts. Read their about page. Feel into their energy and style and decide if you like it and might enjoy working with them.

You’re obviously on my blog, so explore some more posts if you’d like, or leave a comment below and I’ll respond here. Links to Instagram and LinkedIn are in the footer at the bottom of this page. Go check me out there and shoot me a DM if you’d like.

If you like what you find, go ahead and schedule a call.

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